History of Deaf Japanese Sports: 1918 - 2008

1918
On July 7, Tokyo Branch of the Japanese Deaf-Mute Society holds the Tokyo Baseball Tournament at government-owned Tokyo School for the Deaf-Mute in Koishikawa.
 
1926
 In November, the Japanese Association for the Deaf-Mute holds the first Athletic Meet for the Deaf-mute. This event continues by the cooperation of the Ministry of Education, schools for the deaf, and deaf-mute groups until wartime control in the 1940's.

1938
In May, the National Track and Field Meet for the Deaf-Mute is held in Kyoto.

1940
On October 20, the baseball tournament (official title unknown) is held in the government-owned Tokyo School for the Deaf-Mute. Tokyo City School for the Deaf-Mute Alumni Association Baseball Club, named "Kashiwaba Club", and others participate.

1941
In July, the discontinuance order of the national sports events is put out by the Undersecretary of the Ministry of Education notifying.

1943
Baseball is banished as a "hostility sport" during the wartime by the School Physical Education Training Outline of the Ministry of Education. As a result, deaf-mute groups are forced to dissolve their baseball clubs.

1944
The Pacific War, part of the World War II, intensifies and calls for a decisive battle; social and sporting activities are stopped as well as the welfare activity. This state continues until 1945 when Japan is defeated.

1947
The Japanese Federation of the Deaf starts. The tradition of sports at prewar days resumed; sporting activities by the Deaf begin to revive across the nation.

1948
- On May 30, the first Kinki-Regional Schools for the Deaf Baseball Tournament is held at the Osaka City School for the Deaf.

- On August 15-16, the first Kanto-Regional Rubberball Baseball Game is held at the Tokyo School for the Deaf-Mute.

1953
In November, the first Kanto-Regional Schools for the Deaf Track and Field Meet is held.

1955
On September 24, the first National Deaf Baseball Tournament is held in Kyoto. This event continues as a rubberball baseball game after being absorbed to the National Sports Meet in 1968.

1962
At the 12th National Conference of the Deaf held in Fukuoka Prefecture, the resolution that Japan participates in the World Games of the Deaf is adopted.

1963
Establishment of an independent sports organization of the Deaf is called for in order to join the CISS (currently International Committee of Sports for the Deaf: ICSD) memberships. As a result, in March, the Japanese Athletic Association of the Deaf forms and immediately applies for the CISS membership .

1964
- In January, the application of Japanese Athletic Association of the Deaf for CISS membership is approved.

- February 15-16, the first National Deaf Table Tennis and Physical Exercise Championships is held. 149 atheletes including students from schools for the Deaf participate.

- On September 17, two students from Fukuoka Prefecture Nogata School for the Deaf and one student from Osaka City School for the Deaf are selected as a domestic torch relay runner for the Tokyo Olympic Games.

1965
On June 27-July 3, the Japanese national team (7 athelets and 4 officials) participates in the 10th World Games of the Deaf in Washington DC for the first time. About 890 atheles and others from 28 countries participate. The Japan team competes in track and field, swimming and table tennis, winning a bronze medal in the men's marathon and a silver medal in women's table tennis.

1967
- The Japanese team first participates in the 6th World Winter Games of the Deaf in West Germany (12 countries). No medals for Japan.

- On October 23-24, first national Deaf sports meet is held in Tokyo; about 500 athelets and officers participate.

- On June 17, the High School Physical Education League revokes qualification of Endo Muneshi, a high school student of the Tokyo University of Education School for the Deaf to entry in Kanto-Regional High School Track and Field Championships as  any school for the Deaf is not qualified according to the League.

1968
On February 5-6, the first national winter sport meet for the Deaf held in Gunma Prefecture. 110 athletes from 16 groups participate in three items: downhill, slalom, and giant slalom.

1971
on April 1, Adachi Yukio and Ezaki Koichi are registered as first deaf official judges in the third category by the Japan Association of Athletic Federations.

1974
In July, at the regional prelimamenty games for National High School Rubber Baseball Tournament, Fukui Prefectural School for the Deaf wins first time. However, they are denied to compete at the prefecture level game because of a deaf school.

1981
On August 1, Okinawa Prefectural Kitashiro School for the Deaf is refused to join the Japanese High School Baseball League because of a school for the Deaf. The "Japanese Deaf News" publishes an article on the issue, attracting nation-wide attention.

1982
- On April 24, the Japanese High School Baseball League officially decides to allow Okinawa Prefectural Kitashiro School for the Deaf to join the League.

- On October 16-17, the 18th National Sports Program for persons with disabilities is held in Shimane Prefecture; first volleyball game for the Deaf included.

1984
Informal Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Meet is held in Hong Kong.

1986
- October 27 - November 1, the second JAL Cup Asia Pacific Deaf Soccer Championships is held in Kyoto. Five countries participate: Australia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Japan. South Korea wins the championship.


1988
On March 26 - April 3, the Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Meet is held in Melborune, Australia. The Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Conference is formed.

1992
On April 18-26, the  Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Conference is held in Seoul, South Korea.

1996
On March 30 - April 7, the Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Conference is held in Kuala Lumpor, Malaysia.

1998
- In the 18th Olympic Winter Games held in Nagano in February, a Deaf jumper, Takahashi Ryuji from Hokkaido acts as a test jumper for the jump game.


- in July, the Deaf baseball team from United States is invited to the Japan-U.S. Deaf Friendship Baseball Tournament which is held in Japan.


1999
- The Japanese team win medals for the first time in the women's alpine at the 14th World Winter Games of the Deaf held in Davos, Switzerland in February; a silver medal in slalom and a bronze medal in giant slalom.

- in June, Japanese Federation of the Deaf abolishes its Deaf Physical Education Division and puts the Japanese Athletic Association of the Deaf, renamed to "Japanese Sports Association," into JFD's system.

2000
- The Japan-U.S. Deaf Baseball Tournament is held in Washington, D.C. in July.

- On August 12- 16, the  Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Conference is held in Taipei, Taiwan.

2004
At the professional baseball draft meeting, a Deaf pitcher Ishii Yuya who previously played for the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Yokohama is nominated for the first time ever. He is the 6th player to be nominated for Chunichi Dragons Team as a pitcher, making the debut in 2005.

2008
The Asia-Pacific Deaf Sports Conference in Kuwait is canceled.


Japanese source:
http://www.jfd.or.jp/deaflympics/history/part1.php

No comments: