Deaf hostess speaks at coming of age ceremony in her hometown in Aomori Prefecture

Rie Saito puts down her message
which is projected on the large-scale screen
on the stage (photo: osaka.yomiuri.co.jp)


Rie Saito (25), who lost hearing due to sickness, wrote a book on her half life, titled "The hostess who talks in writing". About 128,000 copies have been sold out as one of the best selling books.

The Mainichi Broadcasting produced a drama based on the book to be aired at 21:00 on January 10th.

As the book tells, Rie was a rebellious girl against her parents who gave her a severe discipline since the childhood, and chose the road to become a hostess until she gripped a lot of minds of the people in Ginza, Tokyo.

The Coming of Age ceremony took place in Aomori City, a part of northern Japan, on January 10, which about 2000 young people aged 20 participated.

Rie, a native from Aomori City, gave her message, which was projected onto the large-scale screen, "The life without hardness is an easy life. The life with hardness is fortunate".

When asked, "How would you recover yourself when you are in a painful situation?" she answered, "When you feel painful, it means you are on the way to happiness. I accept it in a positive way".

In closing, Rie reminded the young audience, "Please never forget the feeling of thankfulness".

Junki Tanaka (19), a hearing university student, said, "Her message sounded impressive. I will appreciated my parents' love and want to become independent in society in the future".


Japanese sources:
http://mainichi.jp/enta/geinou/news/20100107dde012200070000c.html

http://osaka.yomiuri.co.jp/possibility/news/ps100111a.htm

No comments: