Deaf Japanese History: 1940's - 1950's

1940
To reduce financial burden on families with deaf children, plans to award scholarships set forth, along with plans for a school lunch program and assistance for school supplies, etc.

1942
JAD forced to be combined with Association of Administrators of Deaf and other organizations, renamed Foundation of Education and Welfare for the Deaf-Mute, due t o war control; publishes a newsletter, "Roa-no-Hikari" (The Light for the Deaf-Mute), related to education and welfare; disbanded two years later due to WWII wartime activities.

1945
Japan surrenders, occupied by American force.

1946
National association of teachers of the deaf formed.

1947
- Basic School Law, School Education Law, and others enacted.

- Special census conducted on the deaf population and their actual situations.

- Meeting held at Ikaho Hot Springs in Gunma Prefecture to form organization of the deaf called Japanese Federation of the Deaf (JFD), holding national conference in Ikaho.

1948
- Government ordinance issued on compulsory education.

- Term, "Mute," removed from the official names of schools across the nation.

- Newspaper for the deaf, "The Japanese Deaf News," published.

- JFD holds Board meeting and national conference in Kyoto first after WWII.

- Helen Keller revisits Japan and gives speeches.

1949
- Pension for persons with disabilities raised.

- Law for Establishment of Rehabilitation for the Deaf and Welfare Law for Persons with Disabilities issued.

- New law regulates certification and licensing of teachers.

- JFD holds Board meeting in Kanazawa.

1950
- Two-year-training program for teacher of deaf children starts at universities. extended to four-year program later.

- Dormitory of Okayama School for the Deaf burnt down and 16 deaf children die.

- JFD granted as incorporated organization by Ministry of Health and Welfare.

- Toshifumi Fujimoto elected as first JFD president.

- JFD holds first Board and representative meetings in Kyoto.

1951
- First deaf handcrafts exhibit held in Kyoto with over 100 items.

- 2nd JFD national conference held in Tottori Prefecture with 500 participants.

- World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) formed in Rome, Italy.

1952
- "The Deaf News" renamed to "The Silent News."

- JFD holds 3rd national conference in Tokyo with 2,000 participants.

- Deaf Center set up in Kumamoto Prefecture.

1953
- Government ordinance issued to make junior high school education for the blind and deaf compulsory.

- 4th JFD national conference held in Beppu, Kumamoto Prefecture with 800 participants.

- WFD holds World Congress which Japan is unable to attend.

1954
5th JDF national conference held in Odaru, Hokkaido.

1955
- Deaf students admitted to colleges/universities.

- 6th JFD national conference held in Osaka with 2,500 participants.

- WFD holds 2nd World Congress in Yugoslavia.

- First national baseball games for the deaf held in Kyoto.

1956
- Rehabilitation Institute for the Deaf opens in Kyoto Prefectural Welfare Center for Persons with Disabilities.

- "The Deaf World" published again as JFD's official publication.

- JFD Board meeting held in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture reelecting Toshifumu Fujimoto as president.

- JFD holds special national conference in Tokyo with 800 participants to promote establishment of national rehabilitation center for the deaf.

1957
- Establishment of national rehabilitation center for the deaf proposed at cabinet level, and construction of the center starts.

- JFD holds 7th national conference in Kochi Prefecture with 700 participants.

- Toshifumi Fujimoto awarded with high honor from Emperor Hirohito.

1958
- Curriculum for blind and deaf students at elementary and junior high school levels outlined.

- National Rehabilitation Center for the Deaf opens.

- Employment Promotion Law for Persons with Disabilities proclaimed.

- Caravan campaigns throughout Japan to allow the Deaf to get driving license.

- 8th JFD national conference held in Tokyo with 2,700 participants.

1959
- 3-year preschool program starts.

- Deaf students forms societies in Osaka and later in Tokyo in 1962 to enlighten public and college on the need for higher education.

- First 51 deaf persons complete courses at National Rehabilitation Center for the Deaf.

- National conference on education of deaf children held in Kyoto.

- Over 100 deaf persons killed or injured by typhoon.

- JFD holds 9th national conference in Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture with 500 participants, resolving to apply for WFD membership.

- Eiichi Takada of Kyoto passes civil service examination and becomes first deaf
official.

- First deaf artists' works exhibited in Tokyo.


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