Local school for the deaf shows the classes to the public in Nagasaki Prefecture

The Sasebo School, a branch school of the Nagasaki Prefectural School for the Deaf in Sasebo City in a southern part of Japan demonstrated the classes to the public on October, 28, 2008.

This event is held twice every year to promote the public understanding of the deaf education. About 30 individuals, including hearing school teachers and sign language students, observed the classes.

The deaf children are enrolled from kindergarten through junior high school; ten students in total. Some children commute from Imari City, Saga Prefecture, a neighboring area, besides northern cities in the Nagasaki prefecture such as Sasebo City and Saza-cho, too.

The theme of the kindergarten class was to make animals with the paper clay, etc. The children visited the city subtropics flora and fauna garden on the previous day, and made animals such as giraffes and elephants that impressed them.

Moreover, the elementary school children had a physical education class and the drawing and manual arts class, respectively, while there were a science class and a social studies class for the junior high school students.

The school plans to hold a "presentation day" on November 9. The children will demonstrate a play and the chorus.

The school also offers the counseling service related to deafness at any time.

Source: Mainichi Shimbun, Oct. 29, 2008
(Japanese edition)
http://mainichi.jp/area/nagasaki/news/20081029ddlk42100479000c.html

2 comments:

ck said...

Still reading your posts!

You cited a source, probably a newspaper. Even though I could not read Japanese, I still would like to go to the website of the newspaper and see the pictures and how the article is composed.

Can you include links to the sources if they are available in the internet?

How I would like to see other countries post news like this. Someday maybe.

Keep up with your contributions here.

Deaf Japan News said...

Thank you for the comment. Yes, I pick up some interesting articles from Japanese online newpapers and translate them into English in part. Sure, I will include links to the sources.